Pictures: Greta Goose Nesting

hiker

Below is a series of pictures as mama Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) re-arranges the nest and rotates her eggs. She revealed 5 eggs as she did a quick re-arrangement of her nest. Female Canada Geese lay one egg every one to two days and there may be anywhere from 1 to 8 eggs. She incubates the eggs for about 28 days and does not leave the nest, eat, drink, or bathe while the eggs are incubating. Goslings hatch using their "egg tooth" to crack open the shell. Mom protects them and keeps them warm in the nest for about a day. Unlike some baby birds, goslings are capable of walking, swimming, and finding their own food as many hikers have likely witnessed.


What? There are eggs under me?

Goose on nest

 

Okay ... I see 1, 2, 3?

Three eggs visible

 

By golly! I see 4 now.

Four eggs visible

 

Yep, 4 ... better move them around a bit.

Four eggs visible

 

I can't believe it. There's a 5th one.
Gordon, where are you? We have 5!

Five eggs visible

 

Yes, definitely five!
(This picture taken in the afternoon, hence shadow.)

Moving eggs

 

Okay, back under you go.
I hope we don't need any of those non-medical masks we keep seeing.

Moving eggs

 

Stay warm dear Goslings.
It's going to be another one of those cold 2020 April nights!

Tidy up nest

 

A few days later Greta had 4 goslings from her 5 eggs.
Two goslings are visible in the picture below.

Two goslings visible

 

Three goslings visible below. A forth survived.
The 5th egg hatched but the gosling inside did not survive.

Tidy up nest

VIDEO >>>> Canada Goose Laying an Egg

Links to more pictures:

Snowstools | A "Pileated" White Pine | Red Trillium Variant at Huron Natural Area | Snowshoe at rare Charitable Research Reserve 2014 | A Story of Two Amulrees & The Highland Clearances | The Swamp Crew | Tynemouth Hooligans | "Wild Turkeys" | Hackberry | Turk's-cap Lily | Snowshoeing at Petersburg Tract 2015 | Niagara Glen | Massasauga rattlesnake  | We Hiked the Bruce Trail In Small Doses | Frogs Croaking at Huron Natural Area | Female flower of Black Pine  | Canada Goose Nesting | Red-Tailed Hawks | Snapping Turtle | Thistles & Tongue Twister ... more to follow .